How was it Done.

lee_broom

An email conversation between lee Broom and a photographer friend about an extrordinary flower photo.

PF:  Hey magical mystery mind! LOL

The past couple days, I can’t seem to pull myself away from the computer. Feeling guilty cuz the weather is just so-darn-nice! So many things to look up and learn about!!! Looking for a Photoshop technique that will teach how to do this. Really like the pastel painterly effect.

ScreenShot2013-05-04at10.26.15AM

Lee: HERE’S my guess; the image is really the same image twice. The background is a close-up of the zinnia or whatever it is and has been blurred to disguise the distortion of separating pixels. The closer image is then overlaid atop the fuzzy close-up. The complimentary colors in the background are the opposite of those in front, so perhaps the background is a negative image.

The lack of tech knowledge forces me to use my often flawed imagination. Whaddaya think?

PS: I am typing with my right middle finger while eating sour dough bread and an avocado and a fresh hothouse tomato. Beautiful image.

PF: Wow! You are great at figuring this out! You should be doing Photoshop!!!

I was kind of thinking in the same direction. Without spending a zillion hours to tweak this, was looking for the ‘recipe’ of directions to do this.

Was your photo below taken at the City Hall Gallery? Are those photos or paintings??

004

Your sandwich sounds delish… I’m hungry.

Lee:  The current show is photography.

Phoenix Icons: The Art of Our Historic Landmarks,’ features photographs of more than 30 historic Phoenix landmarks, by Patrick Madigan and Michael Lundgren.The exhibit is the second in a series of rotating exhibitions from the city’s historic Municipal Art Collection of 1,000 artworks.”
I’ll send you a book of printed images from the show.
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A Moment in the Life of Docent

gallery 7 2013 001

Hi Gary.
What a surprising visit yesterday. Your story, your self-perceived purpose and the changing specifics of your goals made for a stimulating conversation. One never really knows what gets the most attention from one’s audience so I offer you my own impression of this memorable event.
I listened deliberately to your words, not realizing the extent to which my own life’s biases were filtering your ideas and fitting them into my own (I dislike it when others do that to me.). And suddenly you began talking about the process of live interaction with other scholars and the benefits thereof, to all involved. I tend to view scholars as members of Jung’s silent army of introverts (we are quite okay, thank you) and then this…..Did I agree?……..”Yes”, I said to myself. “Yes, I do.”
After you left, the lady who was signing in at the time, spoke up, (well not quite “up”); she was difficult to understand. She was complaining, mostly to herself, that until recently she had a career as a well-known calligrapher and now she had trouble signing her name. She went on to complain that she had enjoyed singing, that she had always enjoyed a beautiful soprano voice and that now she was reduced to slurring every word and in voice with a tremor and no volume control.
I asked about her career and about future plans. We had a short but lively conversation, once I  learned to understand her. Unable to read her name or to understand her introduction, I think she may be Annie.
We moved from our own short biographies to those of the Artists.  I gave Annie the deluxe tour, discussing the personalities of the engravers on display and answered her questions.
As we moved from the rear of the gallery back into the front room we encountered another visitor. Attention now focusing on us, his eyes betraying the difficulty with which his brain was making a transition to something more surprising than two people coming his way, the visitor’s eyes widened , his pupils grew large and his voice practically shouted, “Annie. Dear Annie, where have you been. I haven’t seen you in months. And I knew that Annie was moving on.
I’ll let you know if I am able to arrange a meeting with your friend. Max.
Nice meeting you, Gary.
Enjoy your weekend.
Lee.

How was it Done.

lee_broom

An email conversation between lee Broom and a photographer friend about an extrordinary flower photo.

PF:  Hey magical mystery mind! LOL

The past couple days, I can’t seem to pull myself away from the computer. Feeling guilty cuz the weather is just so-darn-nice! So many things to look up and learn about!!! Looking for a Photoshop technique that will teach how to do this. Really like the pastel painterly effect.

ScreenShot2013-05-04at10.26.15AM

Lee: HERE’S my guess; the image is really the same image twice. The background is a close-up of the zinnia or whatever it is and has been blurred to disguise the distortion of separating pixels. The closer image is then overlaid atop the fuzzy close-up. The complimentary colors in the background are the opposite of those in front, so perhaps the background is a negative image.

The lack of tech knowledge forces me to use my often flawed imagination. Whaddaya think?

PS: I am typing with my right middle finger while eating sour dough bread and an avocado and a fresh hothouse tomato. Beautiful image.

PF: Wow! You are great at figuring this out! You should be doing Photoshop!!!

I was kind of thinking in the same direction. Without spending a zillion hours to tweak this, was looking for the ‘recipe’ of directions to do this.

Was your photo below taken at the City Hall Gallery? Are those photos or paintings??

004

Your sandwich sounds delish… I’m hungry.

Lee:  The current show is photography.

Phoenix Icons: The Art of Our Historic Landmarks,’ features photographs of more than 30 historic Phoenix landmarks, by Patrick Madigan and Michael Lundgren.The exhibit is the second in a series of rotating exhibitions from the city’s historic Municipal Art Collection of 1,000 artworks.”
I’ll send you a book of printed images from the show.